Posts Tagged ‘studios’

I join Lesley Riley on Art and Soul Radio Tonight

 Lesley Riley

 Lesley Riley is an internationally known quilter and mixed-media artist.  Besides being a book author and teacher, Lesley is also the force behind Artist Success.  Leslie and I will be chatting tonight at 7 p.m. Eastern on Art and Soul Radio about my art, my passions, and, of course, Foto/Fiber 2012. Lesley has gained rave reviews coaching artists on exactly what to do to turn art dreams into reality.  She has frequently appeared on Quilting Arts TV as well as appearing in instructional DVDs.  Lesley introduced TAP (Transfer Artist Paper) which has made many artists, including me, quite happy.

 Lesley is donating two BONUSES from her studio for Foto/Fiber 2012.   I think you can tell by these detail photos that you can expect something wonderful when you open your envelope.  Lesley tells me that her BONUSES may include fiber items from around the world, hand-dyed fabrics, vintage lace, painted TAPped cotton with original photo and more.

 

Remember you can choose Lesley as your Fiber Bonus artist on February 15, but your Fiber Bonus artist will be assigned to you at random on February 16.  Foto/Fiber 2012 opens at 10 a.m. Central this Wednesday, February 15. All the directions to participate in Foto/Fiber 2012 are here.  Of course, 100% of the proceeds are donated directly to the American Cancer Society and you will receive an immediate receipt of donation from the ACS.

 

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02 2012

In the Studio with Gail Myrhorodsky

 

 Gail Myrhorodsky

Gail Myrhorodsky creates unique hand-painted art cloth in wonderfully saturated colors as well as fiber art using her own fabric. Creating art fabric is a very time consuming process as the fabric is first washed and prepped for dyeing and then individually painted.  After dye or paint has set, all fabrics are rinsed thoroughly (some over 10 times) to remove excess dyes. Then all the fabric is washed in very hot water and Synthropol, and rinsed several more times. Many of the bright and darkly intense pieces undergo a hot wash with Retayne as well, which helps prevent bleeding. Then they are dried in a hot dryer and steam pressed. Gail’s silk and cotton fabrics are available for purchase through her GailForces studio as well as at quilt events.

1.  How do you find/make time to be in your studio?

After work, dinner and clean-up, it’s time for my art. No questions asked. Even if it’s only for an hour, I make the time to do something I love.

 

2.  Describe your studio in five words.
Way too small for stash!

3.  If you could pick only one thing from your studio to represent your art practice, what would it be?
Organization – or lack of it thereof. My studio is actually the upstairs apartment of our 2-family home. The fabric room (bedroom) is overflowing with my hand-dyed fabrics. The kitchen has the storage of all the paints, stamps, stencils, bleaching agents and all theother tools for surface design except dyeing.  The dining room is my work space – several “my height” cutting/work tables, my sewing machine, serger and embellisher, iron and design wall. When any of these rooms starts to overflow, it’s time to re-organize.  One cannot create if one cannot find the supplies!

 

Gail is donating three fiber-licious BONUSES to Foto/Fiber 2012.
All three start with a fat quarter of hand-dyed cotton and then Gail is choosing coordinating items from among this list:
Coordinating dyed cotton, yarns, dyed threads and dyed cheesecloth andcotton batt, personally made clay embellishment, beads, dyed vintage doily, dyed silk and wool fibers, yarns, dyed threads, a super inchie, fun foam sculpted, embellishment, glue on petal jewels, sample of Misty Fuse, fat quarter hand-dyed and stamped, stenciled and painted,, metallic netting (gold & black), Angelina, beads, and more.

4. What is the best/worst space you have ever had as a studio?
My worst was a bookcase-separated corner of a living room. The best is my current setup – an apartment with plenty of storage shelves and cabinets.

5.  What would make a “dream studio” for you?
I would love a studio on the first floor with lots of windows and about 3 times the floor space. I could also use some extra space to store and use my spinning wheel.

 

6.  What would you advise someone setting up a studio for the first time?
I would advise to plan carefully for the work space for the type of work you enjoy doing. Have plenty of storage and as much “spread out” floor space as you can manage.

7.  Any unique features/studio pets you would like to share?
It’s not unique, but one of the smartest things I did was raise the main work table to my height so I don’t have to lean over all the time.I’m 5’8″, which isn’t all that tall anymore, but raising the table has saved me lots of pain.  I’m a pretty functional/practical kind of person, so Ialways think of the usefulness of my work tools before aesthetics.

 

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02 2012

In the Studio with Leslie Tucker Jenison

Leslie Jenison

Leslie Tucker Jenison is one very busy artist.  In addition to exhibiting internationally in galleries and juried exhibitions, she also teaches and curates as one half of Dinner At Eight Artists along with Jamie Fingal and has appeared several times on Quilting Arts TV.  Her blog is eclectic and interesting; a recent post is about her daughter’s huge textile installation for an outdoor wedding. Her artwork is inspired by the textural beauty found in the patterns of natural and man-made environments. Leslie’s three Fiber BONUSES for Foto/Fiber 2012 will include a “mailart” collage.

 1.  How do you find/make time to be in your studio?
I consider my studio to be my work/dream place.  I spend time in my studio every single day.  It is a priority!

2.  Describe your studio in five words.

Eclectic, Messy, Colorful, Cocoon, Inspiring

3.  If you could pick only one thing from your studio to represent your art practice, what would it be?

My window, because it represents both a literal and metaphorical source of inspiration to me.  I can look outside into my garden and be inspired by nature, and my studio IS a window into who I am as an artist and a human.

4. What is the best/worst space you have ever had as a studio?

My old dining room table in my first house was the worst (I always had to put everything away after each work session!), and my best space is my current studio.

5.  What would make a “dream studio” for you?

My current space, revised to include a better wet work area and more appropriate supply storage.

6.  What would you advise someone setting up a studio for the first time?
Take into consideration things like access to water, storage, light, and work surfaces.

7.  Any unique features/studio pets you would like to share? 

My schnauzer is my studio assistant-companion.  She steals supplies from me if I need to pay more attention to her!

8.  Any exhibits or special projects we should know about?

Yes!  The 2012 Sketchbook Challenge, our newly-formed group: 8 That Create, Dinner At Eight Artists, and the Sketchbook Challenge book (available for pre-order).

 

Leslie’s three Fiber BONUSES ready to be mailed to lucky patrons of Foto/Fiber 2012.  Each one has a framed mixed-media “mailart” collage and the equivalent of 2 fat quarters of hand-dyed, screenprinted cloth (cotton, silk, or a silk-cotton blend). See more details of Leslie’s Fiber BONUSES on her blog.

***Share the news about Foto/Fiber 2012, a fundraiser for the American Cancer Society, and be entered to win great prizes!***

24

01 2012

In the Studio with Vivika Hansen DeNegre

Vivika Hansen DeNegre

Vivika Hansen DeNegre was recently named Editor of Quilting Arts magazine.  Vivika’s artwork has been shown in exhibitions throughout the United States and is in many private collections. Recent public acquisitions of her work include the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Quilt Study Museum, as well as Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale New Haven Medical Center. I’m excited to have Vivika join us for Foto/Fiber 2012, one of many of the Fiberart For A Cause fundraisers for which she has donated artwork.

1.  How do you find/make time to be in your studio?
I love the time spent in my studio, and value every minute that I can be creative.   As a busy working mother of four children and avid art quilter, those moments can be few and far between unless they are scheduled in advance.  I routinely plan to spend about an hour a day creating in my studio, with bigger chunks of time set aside on the weekends to pursue my passions.  Sometimes the best laid plans need to be set aside, but I try!

2.  Describe your studio in five words.

Colorful, calm, cheerful, natural, quiet.

3.  If you could pick only one thing from your studio to represent your art practice, what would it be?


My pincushion… Isn’t it great?  This is a piece of felted wool that was sliced to make a wonderful pincushion, but the best part is that it doubles as a cover for a jar that holds slivers of fabric and yarn which I use in my nest collages.  It really does represent my aesthetic:  I love repurposed fabrics, practical designs, and clever juxtapositions of texture and color.

4. What is the best/worst space you have ever had as a studio?


I like where I am now and would absolutely call it my best space.  I converted a spare bedroom to studio space, and it also houses my home office.  What could be better than making art quilts or writing about them and promoting the work of others all day long?  I am thrilled to be working in this industry, and my office/studio environment constantly reminds me how lucky I am.

5.  What would make a “dream studio” for you?
I’d enjoy having a modern space with awesome task lighting, a wet studio, and several sewing machines ready to go.  The reality is, you don’t really need a studio to be creative, but it is certainly a luxury that I’d rather not live without!  Let’s not forget that my dream space would come with an assistant who would anticipate my every need, clean up my piles of thread, and keep my scissors sharp…

6.  What would you advise someone setting up a studio for the first time?


Invest in good lighting, a sewing machine that will last a lifetime, a sewing table that allows your machine to sit flush with the top, and a large cutting mat.

7.  Any unique features/studio pets you would like to share? 

 


My trusty pug Elvis is my studio mate.  We rescued him several years ago, and he is forever greatful to have a family that loves him, a patch of sunshine, and a quilted dog bed designed just for him.

8.  Any new exhibits or projects we should know about?
Last June I made a prayer flag every day and posted about them on my blog.  A number of artists expressed interest in joining me in this endeavor, and I started a group blog (theprayerflagproject.blogspot.com) where anyone from around the world can express their hopes, dreams, and prayers in the form of a prayer flag.  So far, these flags are flying in the back yards and studios of more than 30 participating artists.  Join us if you’d like!

 

Vivika is donating three Fiber BONUSES (detail of one shown) using her famous bird motifs to Foto/Fiber 2012, a fundraiser for the American Cancer Society.  Foto/Fiber 2012 opens at 10 a.m. Central on Wednesday, February 15.

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01 2012

In the Studio with Sarah Ann Smith

Sarah Ann Smith

I love this photo of Sarah Ann Smith.  It tells you a lot about her and her artwork.  Sarah, a former diplomat, has enriched the art quilting world through her artwork, her writing, and her teaching.   Her two latest publications are The Best of Quilting Arts: Your Ultimate Resource for Art Quilt Techniques and Inspiration, edited by Pokey Bolton and The Studio Quilt, No. 6:  State of the Art. Learn more about these books on Sarah’s blog.

1.  How do you find/make time to be in your studio?
Sometimes I don’t!   With family and teaching quilting, creating time is scarce.  I try to get chores out of the way as soon as our son is at school, and some days that leaves me time to get to the studio.  I tend to do a lot of designing and revising in my head so that when I DO get to the studio, I can use the time well.

2.  Describe your studio in five words.
Big!  Bright.  Colorful.  Comfortable.  Home. 

Looking over the ironing board and cutting table toward the sewing corner.  I LOVE my old Hoosier and my books!

3.  If you could pick only one thing from your studio to represent your art practice, what would it be?

Thread–each spool is a line of color waiting to shade, define, shape, create! Yes, the antique spool chest is nearly full, and yes, the boxes underneath have thread, and yes, I really do use it all!  It’s just to the right of my sewing tables.

4. What is the best/worst space you have ever had as a studio?
The dining room table was the worst.  The one I have now is the best!

  

Love Love LOVE my design wall / closet:  it used to be a single long wall with no door or windows.  We built 48″ wide doors (3 in front, 3 in back to cover the 21-1/2 feet) that have rigid insulation covered with flannel.  All the distracting clutter and STUFF is behind and out of sight:  teaching supplies and camera equipment on the left, a file cabinet, batting, art supplies and quilt storage at the right end.  

5.  What would make a “dream studio” for you?
What I now have, but with a view (not in the basement).  And a wet studio space would be nice, but isn’t essential.  When we moved last February, the space was grim, but I knew that with good lighting, work and persistence I could make my almost-dream-studio, and I have.  Now I need 37 hours a day so I can spend more time there!

The “Before” picture of part of the studio when we moved in almost a year ago.  Deep chocolate brown (UGH) on the walls, two bare bulbs.  We took down a wall separating two cramped rooms, painted, added LOTS of great lighting and made it the almost-perfect studio.  A view would be better, but I just have to create my own!

6.  What would you advise someone setting up a studio for the first time?
Think about what you do (and want to do) and set things up for the way you work.  You don’t need a huge space, especially to start.  Just find a corner and begin!  That said, store like items together (means only one place to look for paint).  Create “zones.”  Sewing, cutting, ironing, drawing/painting.  Some zones will do multiple things if your space is compact.  Have a tidy attack after finishing a project or phase of a project — that way you can find stuff when you need it.  If you need to, spend the money for really good lighting–it is what makes a studio in the dark basement do-able.

Other than sewing, most of the work happens at the zone on the left for ironing, cutting, and drawing on the new drafting table (which I can raise up to the same height as the worktable).  The least used part of the studio, alas, is the sitting area.  At least the dog uses it!

7.  Any unique features/studio pets you would like to share?

The pug, Pigwidgeon, who seems to think he is a cat and sleeps on sofa backs and arms.  Thumper the cat, who sometimes acts like a dog (don’t tell her, she’d be miffed–she *knows* she is and deserves to be the top of the totem pole and the rest of us are decidedly lower down, and the dog is at rock bottom) and follows me around the house and welcomes me home.  Clearly, they have species identity confusion—I  wouldn’t be without them! (PS…most cats have 18 toes…Thumper has about a foot and a half per leg, proof of her superiority.)

 

This is part of Sarah’s Fiber Bonus for Foto/Fiber 2012.  It is a fabric postcard with movable parts!  The other part is some beautiful hand-dyed fabric; Sarah will be featuring it on her blog before February 15.Foto/Fiber 2012 is February 15 and 16.   Please mark your calendar and join us for this fundraiser for the American Cancer Society.

8.  Any exhibits or new projects we should know about?


Threadwork Unraveled
, my book about using thread for machine work:  applique, quilting.  Nice reviews here. Lots of information about different threads, tension (and how to troubleshoot issues), the right needle for the thread, how to use the threads, and few projects to implement what you’ve learned.

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01 2012